Saturday, May 28, 2011

Boris Karloff: The "Lost" Radio Broadcasts

In 1985, while majoring in film studies at the University of Iowa, Scott Allen Nollen befriended Dr. Edward Lowry, a visiting professor from Texas Christian University, who taught a course on horror films. Both fans of Boris Karloff, the two agreed to co-author a book about the legend who became a household word with his portrayal of Frankenstein’s monster, and for a number of big-screen productions was billed on the screen simply as “Karloff.” Unfortunately, Lowry passed away before most of the work was accomplished. Nollen wrote his book, a solo effort, which has since been considered a scholarly look at the boogeyman whose voice was perfectly suited for radio horrors. Today, his appearances on Lights Out! and Inner Sanctum Mystery (note: the proper title is not Inner Sanctum Mysteries) are regarded as highlights in the collecting field. Yet very little is known about his radio work, regardless of what has been put to print.

Scott Allen Nollen's Book
Dedicated in part to the late Dr. Lowry, Nollen’s 1991 book, Boris Karloff: A Critical Account of His Screen, Stage, Radio, Television and Recording Work, was the first major effort to catalog all of Karloff’s known performances behind the radio microphone. Historians have since quoted brief passages from the book. Evelyn Karloff, the actor’s widow, praised the tome. Ray Bradbury admitted he was “impressed.” But the story continued in 1999 when Nollen, with the participation of Sara Jane Karloff (Boris’ daughter), offered a second volume of Karloff’s work -- this time centered on the actor’s personal life. Boris Karloff: A Gentleman’s Life was published through Midnight Marquee Press, Inc. in 1999, offering a revised and expanded list of Karloff’s radio credits. To date, this list is the most comprehensive and the highest compliment I can afford to give is that Nollen’s credits have been frequently consulted when a possible new discovery is made.
 

Gregory William Mank's Book
These two books, combined with Gregory William Mank’s superb volume, Bela Lugosi and Boris Karloff: The Expanded Story of a Haunting Collaboration (2009, McFarland Publishing), provide more information about Boris Karloff than you could ever remember in your lifetime. Gord Shriver’s Boris Karloff: The Man Remembered (2004) by Gord Shriver and Stephen Jacobs’ Boris Karloff: More Than A Monster (2011) also offer superb biographies about the actor’s super stardom. But after reading all these impressive reference works, and Don Glut’s essay, “When The Airwaves Trembled,” in Forrest J. Ackerman’s 1969 tribute to Karloff, could there be more information about Karloff’s radio work that hasn’t been written about? 
Turns out, there is.

It’s a known fact in the old time radio community that no one can possibly create a “definitive” list of radio credits for any particular Hollywood actor. Numerous factors come into play. The main (and most obvious) is because no one sat at a desk for three decades and took notes as to which Hollywood celebrity appeared before the microphone. While on tour to promote their motion pictures, or performing on stage in road companies, celebrities agreed to appear on local radio stations that were independent from the national chains, and most of that programming has been relatively unexplored. For all we know, Karloff took a one week vacation to Canada and while acting as a tourist in Toronto, agreed to a five minute interview on a local morning radio program. In short, we’ll be adding radio credits to such lists year after year after year.

Major Hollywood celebrities such as Clark Gable and Jean Harlow have yet to receive the kind of treatment Nollen gave for Karloff. Even Orson Welles scholars avoid one that exists in circulation: How many people know that Orson Welles makes a brief cameo (in the form of an in-joke reference about him) in the October 3, 1946 broadcast of Suspense, “Three Times Murder,” which featured Rita Hayworth as a femme fatale? He does.

As a fan of old horror films, documenting radio credits of such luminaries as Bela Lugosi and Lon Chaney Jr. have become an obsession. Every possible lead to track down another program title and airdate opens the door to a new discovery. I have yet to see a list of Bela Lugosi’s radio credits published that is impressive, or accurate. Stephen D. Youngkin, author of The Lost One: A Life of Peter Lorre (2005, University Press of Kentucky), featured an extensive list of Peter Lorre’s radio credits, courtesy of Cheryl Morris, who tracked down such minute details as Lorre’s German radio credentials! Just last month, I handed Cheryl two more entries to add to the list, recently unearthed at an archive. These are examples of such continued documentation.

www.PeterLorreBook.com
And there is some good news to come out of all this. Three of us have recently made a giant leap in radio research. Up until now, people went through newspaper listings on microfilm and that process has been extremely slow. After four years of scanning what must be tens of thousands of pages into “searchable PDF files,” and with the assistance of two good friends, a massive, customized database has been finally been compiled on a terabyte hard drive. With a little patience and some clever maneuvering, we can now explore documents that open the gateway to trekking further than ever in the field of old-time radio research. Gerry Hamlin customized and created the software that now allows us to search all of our customized files. The three of us can now utilize this system and document radio credits for Hollywood actors that might otherwise have continued to go unnoticed and undocumented in the coming centuries.

In an effort to test the system after the entire project was completed, our first choice was simple: Boris Karloff. What follows is a list of previously undocumented radio credits, or what some might refer to as Boris Karloff’s “lost” radio credits. But before you scroll down the list and start jotting down titles and broadcast dates, I would like to add a few notes of importance.

Archival studio records on microfilm captured on camera for our project.
1. This is probably the first time knowledge of this database has gone public. Close friends in the past six months have been aware of the project and been kind enough to keep it under wraps. As much as we would love to make this database available to the public (and more importantly, to scholars and authors who want to start documenting extensive lists of their own), we do not have the capability of putting this database online. For this, I apologize in advance and can assure you honestly and sincerely, when the opportunity rises, we will do so.

2. The database was not compiled from newspaper listings or trade periodicals that “predict” what was scheduled for nation-wide, network broadcasts. I know of no serious historian or college/university professor who relies on those sources (Radio Daily included). Why? Because they act in the same manner as TV Guide. Newspaper listing offer what was “planned” or “scheduled,” and last minute changes were quite common. (Heck, if you consulted the New York Times for 20 years of Suspense radio broadcasts, you’ll find that almost one out of every four entries cites an incorrect title or actor. So why on Earth would anyone want to consult newspaper listings?) And I cannot stress this enough: I know of no true researcher in the field who relies on newspapers for reference and anyone who claims to use newspapers as a source of information needs to reevaluate their past findings. I proved this multiple times with a slide show presentation at the 2010 Friends of Old Time Radio Convention in Newark, New Jersey, and everyone seemed to agree with me. Newspapers cannot be trusted.

3. The source for our database comes from periodicals and archival network files which printed cast names after-the-fact. These include radio reviews and broadcast logs that were recorded at the networks. Yes, a critic’s review of last night’s broadcast in a periodical such as Variety or Broadcasting is far more accurate than a newspaper listing.

Personal note: In March of 2011, I made the trek up to Syracuse, New York, to attend the annual Cinefest Convention. For four days, cinephiles were treated to some rare gems screened from archival 16 and 35mm masters. They screened silent films I never heard of, pre-code classics and a version of Alice in Wonderland (1931) that I never heard before. For me, the highlight of the weekend was on the morning of March 18, when a 1941 film short, Information, Please, based on the popular radio quiz program, featured guest Boris Karloff. One can easily see that Karloff got along very well with the witty panelists, which explains his numerous appearances on the radio program. Oscar Levant made a great comment about the boys growing up, comparing himself to Karloff. The short closed with a question from Clifton Fadiman asking for the name of drinks, after describing the ingredients. Karloff, at the last second, figured out one of the drinks was a “zombie.”

This is not meant to be a complete list of all known radio appearances of Boris Karloff. If you found this web-page in the hopes of finding a complete list of Karloff’s radio career, my advanced apologies. The focus of the list is to document what has not yet been preserved in published reference guides. Obviously, broadcasts not listed below can be found in Scott Allen Nollen’s book, including the obvious Karloff appearance on Lights Out! such as the widely-circulating “Cat Wife.” I have no intention of posting the information found within the pages of his book. To do so would not only be a disservice to Mr. Nollen, but disrespectful. There is already enough people “lifting” material from successfully published books, for various reasons, for inclusion on their own web-sites. This author will have nothing to do with that. Nollen’s book (along with all the others mentioned above) come with my highest recommendation and deserve space on your book shelf.

NBC publicity photo.
 Among the previously-undocumented episodes is Listen, America (1941-42), which was meant to dramatize the stirring and significant story of America’s mighty new quest for health. Presented by NBC in cooperation with the Women’s National Emergency Committee, each episode featured an epochal story in the progress of man’s war against hunger and malnutrition; a real-life case-history dramatization. The People’s Nutritional Forum serve as a clearing house for questions from radio listeners who wrote in each week asking questions about health and nutrition. Distinguished figures in the field of public health serve as forum chairmen. Merle Kendrick and his orchestra provided musical bridges and background. For one particular episode, Boris Karloff appeared in a special drama written for the program, which showed (as explained by the announcer) that he was no longer the world’s greatest menace. “Malnutrition” had taken place.

The latest research also unearthed some mysterious questions. For the December 12, 1954, broadcast of The Nutrilite Show, we know that Virginia O’Brien, a song-vocalist noted for her way of singing “deadpan,” was also a guest. And this particular broadcast happened to be the last episode for Robert Armbruster conducting the orchestra. But what Karloff did or said on the program remains unknown. It seems we know more about the broadcast and nothing about Karloff’s contribution.

For the November 2, 1949, broadcast of This Is Your Life, we discovered he was not the guest recipient, as one would normally expect. Mrs. Erna Rex, real estate agent of Los Angeles, is the guest of honor. Broadcast by transcription, transcribed in an abandoned house, 7060 Franklin Avenue, Hollywood. The house was referred to in Hollywood as “Boris Karloff’s house.” (The commercial was delivered from Hollywood studios.) In keeping with the Halloween theme, Mrs. Rex was ushered into a house “haunted” by her relatives and friends. Ralph Edwards was disguised as a “doctor” and Mrs. Rex was taken to the house by her daughter who led her mother to believe that the doctor wanted to sell his house. Mrs. Rex was chosen as guest because she represented a profession that rendered service to many, especially in the post-war days with housing situations as tight as they were. To make her work easier, Mrs. Rex received a Buick coupe for use in her contact work as a real estate agent. The Buick, plus a radio-phonograph-television set, comprised Mrs. Rex’s “Philip Morris Future.” The special guest who appeared during the final two minutes of the broadcast to tell everybody to get out of his house is Boris Karloff.

Edna Wallace Hopper Variety Show  (January 3, 1932)

Format: musical/comedy variety; Network: CBS; Performers: Edna Wallace Hopper; Broadcast Time: 10 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes.

Hollywood on the Air  (November 24, 1932)

Format: interviews; Network: NBC; Sponsor: Tangee Natural Lipstick; Performers: Jimmy Fidler; Other Guests: Joel McCrea and Katherine Hepburn; Broadcast Time: 12:30 a.m. (technically Nov. 25); Running Time: 60 minutes.

45 Minutes in Hollywood  (August 2, 1934)

Format: variety and interviews; Network: CBS; Sponsor: Bordens; Performers: Cal York with Mark Warnow’s Orchestra; Broadcast Time: 10 p.m.; Running Time: 45 minutes.

Kraft Music Hall  (September 2, 1937)

Format: comedy/variety; Network: NBC; Sponsor: Kraft Phoenix Cheese Corp.; Performers: Bob Burns; Other Guests: Dolores Del Rio and Mario Chamlee; Broadcast Time: 10 p.m.; Running Time: 60 minutes.

For Men Only  (April 10, 1938)

Format: drama/variety; Network: NBC; Sponsor: Bristol-Myers; Performers: George Jessel; Broadcast Time: 8:30 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes. Material: Amidst a number of talk and drama subjects, Boris Karloff appears in person for five minutes to talk about his movie work.

The Fleischmann Hour  (January 5, 1939)

Format: comedy/variety; Network: NBC; Sponsor: Standard Brands, Inc.; Performers: Rudy Vallee; Other Guests: Marek Windheim, singer, and Barney Grant, comedian; Broadcast Time: 8:00 p.m.; Running Time: 60 minutes. Material: Boris Karloff and Walter Tetley stars in a skit titled, “There’s Always Joe Winters.” Claude Rains was originally slated for the role, but he was unable to attend due to an illness so Boris Karloff filled in as the guest.

The Circle (April 16, 1939)

Format: Variety; Network: NBC; Sponsor: Kellogg’s; Performers: Basil Rathbone and Madeline Carroll; Other Guests: Jose Iturbi; Broadcast Time: 10 p.m.; Running Time: 60 minutes.

The Kate Smith Show  (March 7, 1941)

Format: musical/comedy variety; Network: CBS; Sponsor: General Foods; Performers: Kate Smith; Broadcast Time: 8 p.m.; Running Time: 55 minutes.

Bundles for Britain  (April 14, 1941)

Format: patriotic fund raiser; Network: WMCA in New York; Other Guests: Mrs. Arthur Woods and Nancy Walker; Broadcast Time: 4:30 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes. Material: Special war-time broadcast to help raise money for British relief, sponsored by the Bundles For Britain Fund Appeal.

Friendship Bridge  (July 3, 1941)
Format: Variety; Network: WMCA in New York; Broadcast Time: 4 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes. Material: Karloff performs “The Fall of the House of Usher.”

The Gloria Whitney Show  (August 13, 1941)

Format: musical variety; Network: WHN in New York; Sponsor: unknown; Performers: Gloria Whitney, singer; Broadcast Time: 7 p.m.; Running Time: 15 minutes. Material: Karloff appears on the show for an interview.

Special U.S.O. Program  (November 23, 1941)

Format: patriotic fund raiser; Network: WMCA in New York; Other Guests: Paul Lukas; Broadcast Time: 9 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes.

Listen, America  (March 22, 1942)

Format: news and music; Network: NBC Red; Performers: John B. Kennedy; Other Guests: Dr. W.H. Sebrell; Broadcast Time: 3:30 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes.

War Bond Show  (April 9, 1942)

Format: patriotic fund raiser; Network: WMCA in New York; Other Guests: Helen Twelvetrees and Carol Bruce; Broadcast Time: 8:03 p.m.; Running Time: 27 minutes. Material: This was the first of two war bond rally specials (the other was broadcast April 16). Karloff only participated with this broadcast.

Information, Please  (May 17, 1943)

Format: quiz; Network: NBC; Sponsor: Heinz; Performers: Franklin P. Adams and John Kieran; Other Guests: Jan Struther; Broadcast Time: 10:30 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes.

Information, Please  (November 20, 1944)

Format: quiz; Network: NBC; Sponsor: Heinz; Franklin P. Adams and John Kieran; Other Guests: Reginald Gardiner; Broadcast Time: 9:30 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes.

Information, Please  (November 5, 1945)

Format: quiz; Network: NBC; Sponsor: Mobil Oil; Franklin P. Adams and John Kieran; Other Guests: Corp. Arthur Schesinger, Jr.; Broadcast Time: 9:30 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes.

The Kate Smith Show  (January 4, 1946)
Format: musical variety; Network: CBS; Sponsor: General Foods; Performers: Kate Smith; Broadcast Time: 8:30 p.m.; Running Time: 25 minutes.

CBS Publicity Photo of Kate Smith.
The Chesterfield Supper Club  
(January 16, 1946)
Format: music and drama; Network: NBC; Sponsor: Liggett & Myers; Performers: Perry Como and Jo Stafford; Broadcast Time: 7:00 p.m.; Running Time: 15 minutes. Material: Karloff does a scene from David Stanhope’s last great act (“The State demands the life of David Stanhope for the murder of his wife…”) Bernard Lenrow, radio actor, supported Boris Karloff in the scene brief drama.

The Sealtest Village Store  (February 14, 1946)

Format: comedy/variety; Network: NBC; Sponsor: Sealtest Dairy Company (product: Armour); Performers: Jack Haley and Eve Arden; Broadcast Time: 9:30 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes.

Fitch Bandwagon  (March 24, 1946)

Format: music and interviews; Network: NBC; Sponsor: F.W. Fitch; Performers: Cass Daley; Broadcast Time: 7:30 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes. Material: Karloff appeared courtesy of RKO, and the announcer closed the episode with a mention that the screen boogeyman could currently be seen in Bedlam. This program was a popular, long-running program with a guest orchestra and a comedy routine, every week. Larry Keating was the emcee.

The Ginny Simms Show  (April 5, 1946)

Format: musical variety; Network: WABC; Sponsor: Bordens; Performers: Ginny Simms, singer; Broadcast Time: 7:30 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes.

Truth of Consequences  (October 26, 1946)

Format: quiz show; Network: NBC; Sponsor: Proctor and Gamble; Performers: Ralph Edwards; Broadcast Time: 8:30 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes. From Hollywood studios. Material: Karloff takes part in one of the stunts.

Kay Kyser’s College of Musical Knowledge  (March 12, 1947)

Format: musical variety; Network: NBC; Sponsor: Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Company; Performers: Kay Kyser; Broadcast Time: 10:30 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes.

Duffy’s Tavern  (May 21, 1947)

Format: comedy; Network: NBC; Sponsor: Bristol-Myers; Performers: Ed Gardner and Charlie Cantor; Broadcast Time: 9:00 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes. Material: A real estate man named S. Crow comes down to the tavern to purchase the building from Archie, who doesn’t want to sell. Archie gets Boris Karloff to “haunt” the place and scare the guy away.
 
Information, Please  (January 16, 1948)

Format: quiz; Network: Mutual; Sponsor: sustained/none; Franklin P. Adams and John Kieran; Other Guests: George S. Kaufman; Broadcast Time: 9:30 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes.

We, The People  (January 27, 1948)

Format: human interest; Network: CBS; Sponsor: Gulf Oil and Gas; Other Guests: Connie Boswell; Broadcast Time: 9 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes.

Skippy Hollywood Theater  (February 24, 1948)

Format: dramatic anthology; Network: CBS; Sponsor: Rosefield Packing Company; Broadcast Time: 7:30 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes. Material: Karloff appears in a drama titled, “Mr. Bittereau’s Mission.”

We, The People  (July 27, 1948)

Format: human interest; Network: CBS; Sponsor: Gulf Oil and Gas; Other Guests: James Melton; Broadcast Time: 9 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes.

Hi! Jinx  (August 13, 1948)

Format: interviews; Network: NBC; Sponsor: Schenbrunn and Sus.; Performers: Jinx Falkenburg; Broadcast Time: 8:30 a.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes. Material: Jinx Falkenburg, the host of the program, was unable to attend this broadcast because she was at the Polyclinic Hospital in New York City, giving birth to her son, Kevin, born on this date. An unknown substitute host interviewed Boris Karloff in honor of Friday the 13th. The subject of superstition was the main topic of the day.

Stars Over Hollywood  (November 6, 1948)

Format: drama; Network: CBS; Sponsor: Armour; Broadcast Time: 2 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes. Material: Karloff stars in a drama titled “Ghost of a Chance.”

This Is Your Life  (November 2, 1949)

Format: interview; Network: NBC; Sponsor: Philip Morris; Performers: Ralph Edwards; Broadcast Time: 8 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes.

The Barbara Welles Show  (August 18, 1950)

Format: interview; Network: Mutual; Sponsor: unknown; Performers: Barbara Welles; Broadcast Time: 4 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes.

The Wayne Howell Show  (October 7, 1950)

Format: news and interviews; Network: NBC; Sponsor: unknown; Performers: Wayne Howell; Broadcast Time: varies; Running Time: 30 minutes. Material: Howell usually interviewed two guests on each of his broadcasts. Boris Karloff was one of the guests for this broadcast.

Peter Pan  (December 27, 1950)

Format: musical/drama; Network: WNYC in New York; Other Guests: Jean Arthur and Nehemiah Persoff; Broadcast Time: 5:50 p.m.; Running Time: 55 minutes. Material: Beginning April 24, 1950, Boris Karloff played the role of Captain Hook on stage for a total of 321 performances. Jean Arthur played the title role and Nehemiah Persoff played the role of Cecco. The company later recorded a Columbia LP featuring an abridged version of the play. That recording aired over WNYC in New York City, as a special holiday offering for the benefit of the juvenile listeners. The same recording would later be aired on other programs.

Ralph Edwards Show
  (January 4, 1952)

Format: variety/interviews; Network: NBC; Sponsor: unknown; Performers: Ralph Edwards; Broadcast Time: 2:00 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes.

The Paula Stone Show  (February 11, 1952)

Format: interview; Network: WMGM in New York City; Sponsor: unknown; Performers: Paula Stone; Broadcast Time: 12 noon; Running Time: 15 minutes.

The Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis Show  (April 18, 1952)

Format: comedy/variety; Network: NBC; Sponsor: Chesterfield, Anacin and Dentyne; Performers: Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis; Broadcast Time: 8 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes. A recording of this broadcast exists.

What’s My Line?  (May 27, 1952)

Format: quiz show; Network: NBC; Sponsor: Philip Morris; Performers: John Daly, moderator; Broadcast Time: 10:00 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes. Material: Karloff is the “mystery guest.”

Sunday With Garroway  (July 18, 1954)

Format: variety; Network: NBC; Sponsor: multiple sponsors; Performers: Dave Garroway; Broadcast Time: 8:00 p.m.; Running Time: two hours. Material: Karloff performs a reading of “The Three Billy Goats Gruff,” from the Caedmon LP titled, The Pony Engine and Other Stories for Children.

The Nutrilite Show  (December 12, 1954)

Format: musical variety; Network: NBC; Sponsor: Mytinger & Casselberry, Inc.; Performers: Dennis Day; Broadcast Time: 5:30 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes.

The Spoken Word  (March 29, 1956)

Format: variety; Network: WQXR in New York; Sponsor: unknown; Broadcast Time: 9:05 p.m.; Running Time: 25 minutes. Material: Karloff reads three of Rudyard Kipling’s “Just So” stories: “The Cat That Walked by Himself,” “The Butterfly That Stamped” and “How the First Letter Was Written.” These recordings originate from the Caedmon LP. Karloff received a “Best Children’s Album” Grammy Award nomination for this recording. The same recordings would later be aired on other programs.

Monitor (May 20, 1956)

Format: variety; Network: WRCA in New York; Performers: Dave Garroway; Broadcast Time: 7 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes.

The Spoken Word  (June 14, 1956)

Format: variety; Network: WQXR in New York; Broadcast Time: 9:05 p.m.; Running Time: 25 minutes. Material: Karloff reads Rudyard Kipling’s “Mowgli” stories, including “The Jungle Book: Mowgli’s Brothers” (abridged), from the Caedmon LP titled, Rudyard Kipling: Just So Stories and Other Tales.

Let’s Listen to a Story  (October 13, 1956)

Format: variety; Network: WNYC in New York; Broadcast Time: 11 a.m.; Running Time: 15 minutes. Material: Karloff reads one of Rudyard Kipling’s “Just So” stories, from a Caedmon LP.

Monitor (February 17, 1957)

Format: variety; Network: WRCA in New York; Performers: Dave Garroway; Broadcast Time: 8:30 p.m.; Running Time: 30 minutes.

Monitor (February 22, 1958)

Format: variety; Network: WRCA in New York; Performers: Dave Garroway; Broadcast Time: 8 p.m.; Running Time: 60 minutes.

Let’s Listen to a Story  (May 31, 1958)

Format: variety; Network: WMCA in New York; Broadcast Time: 9:05 p.m.; Running Time: 25 minutes. Material: Excerpts from a Caedmon LP are played, featuring Karloff reading Kipling’s “Just So” stories.

Let’s Listen to a Story  (June 7, 1958)

Format: musical/drama; Network: WMCA in New York; Other Guests: Jean Arthur and Nehemiah Persoff; Broadcast Time: 9:05 a.m.; Running Time: 25 minutes. Material: Features a recording of the first half of the 1950 Columbia LP, Peter Pan.

Let’s Listen to a Story  (June 14, 1958)
Format: musical/drama; Network: WMCA in New York; Other Guests: Jean Arthur and Nehemiah Persoff; Broadcast Time: 9:05 a.m.; Running Time: 25 minutes. Features a recording of the second half of the 1950 Columbia LP, Peter Pan.

Monitor  (September 6, 1958)
Format: variety; Network: WRCA in New York; Performers: Dave Garroway; Broadcast Time: 3 p.m.; Running Time: 60 minutes.

Let’s Listen to a Story  (May 31, 1959)
Format: variety; Network: WMCA in New York; Broadcast Time: 8:05 p.m.; Running Time: 25 minutes. Material: Karloff reads Rudyard Kipling’s “Just So” stories, played back from a Caedmon LP.

The Spoken Word  (August 24, 1959)
Format: variety; Network: WYNC in New York; Broadcast Time: 11 a.m.; Running Time: 60 minutes. Material: Karloff reads from Kenneth Grahame’s “The Reluctant Dragon.” The recording originates from a Caedmon LP titled, Kenneth Grahame: The Reluctant Dragon.

The Spoken Word  (December 25, 1959)

Format: variety; Network: WNYC in New York; Broadcast Time: 11 a.m.; Running Time: 60 minutes. Material: Karloff reads “The Fir Tree.” The recording originates from the 1959 Caedmon LP titled, Hans Christian Andersen: The Ugly Duckling and Other Tales.

3 comments:

Cheryl Morris said...

Thanks for the great mention, Martin! I'm rubbing my hands together eagerly at the thought of using the software you mentioned!

Cheryl

Booksteve said...

Just recently got the Mank book. I've always been as much--or perhaps more--fascinated by Karloff's amazingly diverse career than by his actual performances.

Anonymous said...

I'm sure you noticed, Martin, but it's interesting that in the studio archives screenshot, Karloff is listed as "Charles Edward Pratt," instead of listing his actual name, William Henry Pratt. In the biographies I've seen a quote from him several times now that it's a mystery how the incorrect name ever started being used.

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